The Museum is open with updated hours, Wednesday through Sunday, 10 am to 5 pm. Free timed tickets for the Museum collection galleries encourage social distancing, and increased health and safety procedures are in place. Following local ordinances, visitors are required to wear a mask inside all buildings, including restrooms and concession buildings. For the safety of everyone, we ask that all outdoor event attendees wear masks both outdoors and indoors. Learn more about these updates at ncartmuseum.org/covid19.

Stuck at home? Find art inspiration around you!

/ March 13, 2020
Roman, Mosaic, 2nd century, marble and glass, H. 98 1/2 x W. 99 1/2 x D. 2 1/2 in., Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Hanes

Mosaic depicts flowers, knots, and geometric patterns in stone and glass tiles. Create your own mosaic collage out of paper scraps. Cut magazine pages, newspapers, or even old pieces of mail into tiny pieces. Then arrange your paper tiles into shapes and patterns on a larger piece of paper, and use glue to adhere them. What patterns can you create?

Auguste Rodin, The Thinker, modeled 1880, reduced in 1903, this example cast at a later date, bronze, H. 14 3/4 x W. 7 7/8 x D. 11 3/8 in., Gift of the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Foundation in honor of Governor Michael F. Easley and Mary P. Easley

Try a continuous line drawing on paper with a pen, pencil, or marker. Have a friend or loved one pose for you, or look at a picture of a sculpture at the Museum, like The Thinker by Auguste Rodin. Then use your drawing utensil to capture your subject’s pose in one line from start to finish. Try to complete your drawing without lifting your pen or pencil off the paper! Think about choices you can make to show the outline of the pose, shading, and other delicate details.

Minnie Evans, The Tree of Life, 1962, colored pencil on paper, 11 7/8 x 8 7/8 in., Gift of Mr. and Mrs. D. H. McCollough and the North Carolina State Art Society (Robert F. Phifer Bequest)


Make a colorful and symmetrical arrangement of objects you find around the house. Take inspiration from Minnie Evans’s drawing The Tree of Life to create a composition that includes natural and manmade materials on a flat surface. See if you can find objects with different colors or textures, or perhaps include leaves, sticks, or other materials you can gather from the outdoors. Can you create balance in your display?

Courtney Klemens
Courtney Klemens is manager of family programs at the North Carolina Museum of Art.

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