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Due to unforeseen circumstances and expected inclement weather, the Watchhouse concert originally scheduled for Saturday, October 1, has been rescheduled to Friday, October 28. Tickets for the original date can be used for the rescheduled date; just present your ticket at the new event. For additional assistance, or to request a refund, contact help@ncartmuseum.org during gallery hours, Wednesday through Sunday, 10 am to 5 pm. Learn more on the event page.


Please note: West Building is now closed through October 7, 2022, to complete an exciting reinstallation of the People’s Collection. During this time enjoy free exhibitions on view in East Building, indoor and outdoor events and programming, and the 164-acre Museum Park. We’re excited to welcome visitors back to a new Museum experience starting October 8, 2022. Learn more about the opening weekend celebration.

Exhibition

Gentileschi/Wiley: Two Paintings of Judith 400 Years Apart

October 22, 2022—January 15, 2023
East Building, Level A

This exhibition presents two similar yet strikingly different interpretations of the story of Judith and Holofernes: Judith and Holofernes (circa 1612–17) by Artemisia Gentileschi (Italian, 1593–circa 1654) from the Museo e Real Bosco di Capodimonte and Judith and Holofernes (2012) by Kehinde Wiley (American, born 1977) from the North Carolina Museum of Art.

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Taken from the Old Testament Book of Judith, the story features a heroic young widow, Judith, who saves the Jewish town of Bethulia during an attack by the Assyrian army. When the army’s general, Holofernes, falls asleep in a drunken stupor, Judith cuts off his head, and the town subsequently defeats the army. The story of Judith and Holofernes—the vulnerable rising to slay a hostile invader, the oppressed overthrowing their oppressor—holds enduring appeal. The subject appears repeatedly throughout art history, from the Middle Ages to the present. It is depicted by well-known artists such as Caravaggio, Lucas Cranach the Elder, Sandro Botticelli, Gustav Klimt, and many others. Over the years Judith has been interpreted as a virtuous young woman, a seductive femme fatale, and a brave heroine.

Created four hundred years apart, these two paintings by Gentileschi and Wiley of iconic women in acts of courageous defiance and female empowerment stimulate discussion around gender, race, identity, violence, religion, oppression, and power—all of which have remained relevant from the seventeenth century to now.


The exhibition Gentileschi/Wiley: Two Paintings of Judith 400 Years Apart was organized by the Museo e Real Bosco di Capodimonte, the North Carolina Museum of Art, and The Museum Box.

In Raleigh this exhibition is generously supported by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Additional support is made possible, in part, by the North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources; the North Carolina Museum of Art Foundation, Inc.; and the William R. Kenan Jr. Endowment for Educational Exhibitions. Research for this exhibition was made possible by Ann and Jim Goodnight/The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Fund for Curatorial and Conservation Research and Travel.

 

 

Kehinde Wiley, Judith and Holofernes, 2012, oil on linen, 130 1/2 × 99 7/8 in., Purchased with funds from Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Hanes in honor of Dr. Emily Farnham, and with funds from Peggy Guggenheim, by exchange, 2012 (2012.6); © 2022 Kehinde Wiley, Courtesy of the North Carolina Museum of Art and Sean Kelly, New York

Artemisia Gentileschi, Judith and Holofernes, circa 1612–17, oil on canvas, 159 × 126 cm, inv. Q 378, Napoli, Museo e Real Bosco di Capodimonte, Courtesy Museo e Real Bosco di Capodimonte

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