Black and White Gaze

NCMA curatorial intern Cammy Thomas takes museums to task, writing about why showcasing Black female artists is so important.

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Young Artists Exhibition Goes Virtual

The Museum committed to installing winning artworks from the Boys and Girls Clubs as an exhibition. Then came the pandemic and a new plan.

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Beauty, Complicity, Complexity

The story behind Senegalese gold jewelry, and the women who wore it in the 18th and 19th centuries, is layered with a history of oppression and empowerment.

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Style: The Language of Design

The first in a series of Circa posts in which NCMA curatorial intern Taylor Hunkins interprets African utilitarian objects as products of design.

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Bacchus after the Makeover

After years of conservation, Bacchus looks clean, restored, and pretty cool with his new arm and his head back on.

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The Art of Healing: Potent Pigments

The division of art from medicine is a modern concept. In the Middle Ages, the apothecary supplied the same materials to doctors, painters, and anyone in need of medicine.

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Art Advocacy: The Aesthetic of Solidarity

Do allies participate in oppressive systems that further marginalize the communities they attempt to support? Artists in the NCMA's collection pose a challenging question.

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The Art of Healing: Desperate Measures

GSK Curatorial Research Fellow Ángel Gonzalez describes the role of "the flayed one," a Mesoamerican god that could both send or cure sickness.

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The Art of Healing: Faith and Affliction

Artist José Bedia portrays a saint of health and healing often described as showing no mercy to the arrogant but providing solace to the afflicted, especially to the poor and to immigrants.

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The Art of Healing: African Fusion

Many African artists and spiritual practitioners are more than willing to incorporate other ideas into their practice to strengthen their potency, and this becomes apparent in the arts.

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The Art of Healing: Cat Power for Egypt

The lioness-headed Sekhmet, like many Egyptian deities, had a dual nature: She could not only bring pestilence but also ward off epidemics and illness. Sekhmet was the protector of the king and a healing deity, the “mistress of life” who could heal those who suffered. 

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